Posted: 6:11 pm Wednesday, March 5th, 2014

Change of plans for UGA 2015 commit 

By Michael Carvell

OL DeVondre Seymour (247sports)

OL DeVondre Seymour (247sports)

UGA has five commitments for its 2015 recruiting class, and probably the least one you’ve heard about is DeVondre Seymour.

Seymour is the nephew and adopted son of former UGA and NFL defensive lineman Richard Seymour.

“Everybody around here thinks he’s going to be a big-time player in the SEC,” Hinds recruiting coordinator Dwike Wilson told the AJC on Wednesday.

The younger Seymour played at North Gwinnett High School last year, and got the last-minute opportunity to sign with UGA in February 2013, even though he was unlikely to qualify.

This past fall, Seymour reported to Mississippi’s Hinds junior college. The original plan was for Seymour to red-shirt this year and play next season – allowing him to have three years to play three seasons after he transferred to UGA.

The original plan has been tweaked.

“We have around a total of 20 guys on scholarship for offensive line and defensive line, and eight of them were hurt,” Wilson said. “So (Seymour) had to play this past year. We needed him.

“It will still work out all the same for him at Georgia, though.”

Right now, the adjusted plan is for Seymour to redshirt next season at Hinds. He will take classes both sessions this summer with plans of transferring to UGA next January.

“The running back coach (Bryan McClendon) called my yesterday,” Wilson said. “They love him, and they can’t wait to get him on campus. (McClendon) wanted to make sure that he’s on pace to get there next January. He is.”

The 6-foot-6, 310-pound Seymour, who is relatively new to football, played both ways at Hinds. He started on the defensive line in the team’s season-opener, and was the starting right guard in the bowl game.

“He’s still learning the game but he has a lot of the stuff you can’t coach,” Wilson said. “He has the size and the speed. He has got good feet. He can bend. He’s flexible. He does have a mean streak. So he can play pissed off.

“All coaches like to say he’s just raw, but a lot of that is just him catching up with his body. He just grew up so fast. He’s so big. Now he’s finally catching up with his athletic talent with his body. It’s balancing up. He’s maturing as a football player. He’s getting stronger, and that’s helping him to be able to control his body a lot better.”

Wilson was a graduate assistant coach at Ole Miss years ago, and he said that Seymour reminds him of a former player, Terrance Metcalf, who was an All-American offensive lineman that played seven seasons with NFL’s Chicago Bears.

“He has got more raw talent than Terrence does, and (Seymour) is about two inches taller.  But (Seymour) has feet, he has punch, and he’s mean like him.

Wilson thinks if Seymour continues to develop at a fast rate, the big guy could start by his second year at UGA as a red-shirt junior, if not sooner.

“He needs to improve with his upper-body strength and his core strength (his back and stomach). He needs to get those things together and be with a coach who understands protection. He’s just a young offensive lineman. I don’t know too many that are real football savvy starting off. Those guys usually redshirt and become good football players because they’ve been around so long and they understand the game. (Seymour) is learning the game every day.

“He gets better every day he walks out there.”

The elder Seymour has visited Hinds at least three times in recent months. “His dad cares about the grades. He stays on him about the school work.”

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28 comments
DaRealDJ
DaRealDJ

What a joke. Grades are important? No they're not. At least they weren't until it became clear he could get an offer to a D-1 school. So now he's getting his "academics" in order in the 12.5 grade just so he can get into the mighty UGA and take 13th grade curriculum (i.e. be hidden in something for at least 2.5 years - see Jon Jenkins 1.5 years in Early Childhood Development - and he still flunked out). I know you Dawg fans with your law and medical, even Business-related degrees think you have something in common with this "DGD" but you don't.

They should let kids like this go and play in some lesser paid football league and hope he can make it in the NFL one day. Instead writers in the AJC and broadcasters on t.v. will use the term "scholar/athlete" when referring to him one day, which really sucks when also using that term on those that are truly "scholars" and "athletes" (at all schools, even UGA - so, no not just anti-UGA).

And yes, this happens at lots of other schools, regardless of conference. It just happens at the majority of SEC schools, whereas it's usually just a handful in other leagues. But those are the best teams. It is what it is.

SnoopyDawg
SnoopyDawg

“His dad cares about the grades. He stays on him about the school work.”

That's a DGD -D@mned Good Dad!!

I saw DeVondre play at North. Was a newbie to the sport & got by on size& determination..  Sounds like he's  molding into a very good football player!!

Keep up the good work!!!

Keep CPJ!
Keep CPJ!

Best Wishes to the young Mr Seymour. Keep your head in the books and your butt in the weight room. We'll need you as soon as you hit campus.

BigGAdawg
BigGAdawg

DeVondre is going to be such a great Dawg!  I like it when his coaches say things like, "He does have a mean streak. So he can play pissed off."  I think this reflects a proper attitude and mind set for an OL.  He's gonna fit right in.

WOOF WOOF WOOF!!!

Quackmeyer
Quackmeyer

It appears that a lot of folks are pulling for and helping this young man.  Welcome to the Dawg Family!

HotDawg
HotDawg

Mr. Carville, any thoughts on the Grady high school cheaters and how it will affect their football futures?

APS and other public schools cheating, cheating, cheating. And they wonder why so many of these kids have no morals or ethics, and become discipline problems into adulthood.

BTW, Dekalb County is rampant with same problems as Grady HS.

That would be an easy thing to uncover if anyone at the AJC decided to run an expose.

HotDawg
HotDawg

Keep up the good work DeVondre. You'll get there soon enough. Uncle Richard is doing a great job as a parent, with more time away from the NFL. Looking out for the schoolwork. Priority number 1.

NCDawg
NCDawg

The measurables are off the charts.  He is big and not even as big as he could get.  This is going to be interesting to watch.  He has pedigree.

Gandolph
Gandolph

Richard Seymour was a DGD and I hope that DeVondre will become one too!

DavidThead
DavidThead

@DaRealDJ  man this kid was having trouble in life and Richard Seymour adopted him and is trying to help him get his life together....why can't you give the kid a chance

Contractor1
Contractor1

@SnoopyDawg I can appreciate that comment, but if he's so focused and caring about grades, how could he not get his son qualified at Georgia?  We all know standards are SIGNIFICANTLY lowered for athletes at all schools, so if Crowell, Sanks, Pope, and others like them got in as Freshmen, I have no idea how this kid couldn't, especially this day in age when anyone can make a 4.0 in high school the way they're teaching our kids.  All of this, he didn't qualify, but yet his dad sees grades as important?  Something doesn't add up to me, because not all kids are college material.

MichaelCarvell
MichaelCarvell moderator

@HotDawg  If you're asking how this will affect the kids' football future with college scouts, it will have zero impact, in my opinion. None. Zilch. Transferring between high schools is common among the city's top athletes.

gtcaryd
gtcaryd

@NCDawg I think there is something he can take for that.

DaRealDJ
DaRealDJ

Nothing wrong with that. The problem is that you, nor any of these other "DGD" clamoring morons would care if this kid wasn't trying to PLAY football for UGA. Heck, if Auburn, Tenn, Bama or Florida were the team you definitely wouldn't care or you would bash them. Hypocrites....if he's not 6'6" 300+ pounds you don't care. That's the truth. I'm all for giving a kid a chance, but don't get too self-righteous, as there will be many other kids like this that you'll cheer for whether they can do any schoolwork or not.

MikeBanning
MikeBanning

@MichaelCarvell

Colleges could care less when/if Recruits skirt rules while they are in HS, and then act surprised when those same recruits have problems following rules when they get to a college program.

These recruits are not stupid, they know that HS HCs could get reprimanded or fired for their illegal recruitment, so that right there teaches these recruits that they are "above the law" and are special because of their talent, and from that point on it only gets worse.

By the time they get to a BCS Program that has every move covered by some form of the Media, the poor foundation is already set, in many cases they cannot stay out of trouble, especially when you take into account the increased media exposure.

Also, is it fair for another HS HC that runs a "clean program" to get fired for losing too many games to a HS HC that illegally recruits players?

State HS Athl. Associations needs to crackdown on this mess with lifetime bans for all members of the Coaching staff, and loss of eligibility for the players.

IIRC ADs and Asst. Principals at schools are supposed to certify the eligibility of the players at that school, so they need to get some sort of punishment also.

If you start taking away players' Sr. & Jr. years of eligibility then that would clean thing up very quickly.

Just because a young person is pursuing an Athl. Scholly that doesn't mean the rules don't apply to them.

PMR
PMR

@MichaelCarvell  

Good Lord Michael. What is it that's so hard to understand? I HATE to agree with this poad troll, but he wasn't referring to legal transfers. His point is that kids are allowed to break rules, i.e. the Grady kids, in high school. They are taught by admin and coaches and sometimes parents that it's ok to break rules. And then we wonder why they continue to break rules in college. Is that point so hard to grasp????


And for how ever many examples that you can give for legal transfers, I can give you an example of recruiting and illegal transfers and out of district school attendance. Schools have all kinds of ways they skirt GHSA rules in order to get kids there for athletic programs. You think just growing up in the small town of Buford, GA  or Calhoun, GA automatically makes you a great football player? Do you think all those 6'8" kids from NYC are in these private schools for their academic prowess??


I think kids should be allowed to go to school where they want to. But that's not what the rules say. And you have to be able to see the connection between Parents, Coaches and Administrators promoting the breaking of rules and the athletes ability to understand why he suddenly has to comply with rules at the next level. SURELY you can see that.


DawgByte
DawgByte

@POAD2013 @MichaelCarvell  LOL, nice try Nerd. The kids you're referring to also attend ACC schools. Don't for a second exclude your conference or school from this discussion. Tech's been in recent trouble and has received sanctions against if from the NCAA.

tomkat1111
tomkat1111

@POAD2013 Is that why you did not attend Tech ? Because you could not pass the Hill ?

MichaelCarvell
MichaelCarvell moderator

@POAD, huh? "His point is cheating in high school and then these kids go to SEC schools ..." What on Earth are you talking about? None of the 14 Grady kids have any D1 offers, to my knowledge. What does the SEC have to do with anything? The QB from Norcross High School just signed with Nebraska. He went to 4 high schools in 4 years. I can give you countless examples.

MikeBanning
MikeBanning

@POAD2013

You still miss my point, at the end of the day, regardless of illegal recruiting and illegal transfers on the HS level, out of the Top-100 FB recruits from Ga. HSs, about 70/100 can qualify and graduate from GT.

The bottom line is that CPJ has to do a better job closing the deal on these in-state talented recruits and that will set up the next HC for GT FB after Pajamas has been sheet-canned.

MikeBanning
MikeBanning

@MichaelCarvell

Most of time you cannot just randomly transfer to HSs out of your district, that's why School Systems draw up attendance zones for all their schools.

You can't just up and go to the school that has the better Sports program when you choose to, this is especially true when you live in another county, city or school district altogether.

At  that point you are getting educated without your parent's property taxes paying for that education.

POAD2013
POAD2013

@MikeBanning but since you HATE TECH do you think thee kids could actually Pass The Hill? You want The INSTITUTE to recruit these same kids and now you call them out.

The INSTITUTE recruits kids that can Pass The Hill and that is why many will not even consider TECH. The ACADEMIC work needed to STAY in The Institute is more than most of these players would consider and they would NEVER have a Chance of staying eligible.

Shopping High Schools for better IMAGE & Less School Work to get in College is WRONG but welcome to the SOUTH. 

The SOUTH where education is at the bottom of the list of priorities and playing a GAME is GOD.

POAD2013
POAD2013

@MichaelCarvell His POINT is CHEATING in High School and then these kids go to SEC schools where it is basically OKAY to do the same and we wonder WHY they don't get and EDUCATION and Think the RULES don't apply to them.

MichaelCarvell
MichaelCarvell moderator

@MikeBanning I don't understand your points. For starters, there are plenty of kids who transfer to different high schools (and colleges) and do just fine. You may want to consider taking this debate over to the HS blog